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Average Customer Rating
3.3 / 53.3 / 53.3 / 53.3 / 53.3 / 5
3.3 / 5

Average Rating based on 2 Reviews
Value For Money  4.00/5  (4.00)
Cabin Design  4.00/5  (4.00)
Entertainment  2.00/5  (2.00)
Food Quality  2.00/5  (2.00)
Ship Maintenance  4.00/5  (4.00)
Staff and Service  4.00/5  (4.00)

Compared to averages for similar items
Value For Money  4.00/5  (4.00)
Cabin Design  4.33/5  (4.33)
Entertainment  2.67/5  (2.67)
Food Quality  3.00/5  (3.00)
Ship Maintenance  4.33/5  (4.33)
Staff and Service  4.33/5  (4.33)

 
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Wilderness Explorer

Renovated in 2012, the 76-guest Wilderness Explorer is equipped for action, adventure, and exploration.

Displaying Reviews: 1 - 2
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(Review ID: 1063)
 
The Wilderness Explorer is the best way to see Alaska up close and personal., January 25, 2014

Reviewer: Jacqueline
Pros: Top-notch crew, amazing sights, educational programs. Fun and learning.
Cons: Could use more menu variety, few more evening programs.
Date of cruise: August 2012
Departure port: Sitka
Region visited: Alaska
Cabin category: Inside
Found through: AllThingCruise.com
Good for children: No
Good for teenagers: No
    
Jacqueline saw things this way
Value For Money   4.00/5  (4)
Cabin Design   4.00/5  (4)
Entertainment   2.00/5  (2)
Food Quality   2.00/5  (2)
Ship Maintenance   4.00/5  (4)
Staff and Service   4.00/5  (4)

My cabin has a new flat screen TV. The Wilderness Explorer has a big library of DVDs. But I never turned on that TV. No way could it compete with the glorious show that Mother Nature is playing outside the huge windows in my room.

Gigantic humpback whales breach not far from my window. Cavorting and cart wheeling, they snort huge sprays of air and seawater as their bodies slap down on the ocean with massive thuds.

Orca “killer whales” skim through the sea, looking more like sharks with their black fins gleaming against the dark blue water. Once I even glimpsed a sea otter floating along on its back with its toes stuck up in the air. I think it was as surprised to see our vessel as I was to see it.

Forget about manmade entertainment on the Wilderness Explorer as it cruises Alaska. The real show out here is unscripted, the kind of beautiful adventure that can take your breath away.

The ship slows – a sure sign that Captain Marce or some other crewmember or passenger has seen an animal – to watch a coastal brown bear amble along the beach with three cubs in tow. Then another bear shows up with two cubs. Soon after that, a wolf sidles up on a small hillside across a stream from the bears. A second wolf lifts his head to howl. Two bald eagles watch from a tall tree and seagulls circle overhead. But none of the animals seems afraid of the other – almost as though they have staked out their claim and, at least for the moment, are willing to live and left live.

Built in 1976 in Maine, the Wilderness Explorer had several lives under different owners before it joined Un-Cruise Adventures. After undergoing major renovations and getting Un-Cruise Adventures signature forest green hull, the ship was launched in May 2012.

The cruise company includes many extras on its ships. They provide rubber boots free of charge, as well as equipment for the activities. Each cabin has water bottles to use on the cruise and binoculars are near at hand no matter where you are. Complimentary soft drinks, tea and coffee are available. CABINS

All cabins on the Wilderness Explorer are above deck with view windows. Bed configurations include twin or queen with comfortable memory foam mattresses, plump pillows and warm comforters.

My cabin has with two twin beds, a table between, closet, sink with storage underneath, hair dryer and a bathroom with a shower and toilet. Water pressure in the shower is good with plenty of hot water. Each cabin has a flat-screen TV, DVD player and iPod docks. Reading lamps are over each bed. In my cabin, framed photographs of a whale tail and a group of whales misting the air were hints to what we would see on our cruise.

A strong heater can warm into the room in minutes. Air conditioning consists of an open window to let in the crisp cool Alaskan air. As on most cruise ships, there are no clocks so be sure to bring a clock or watch.

Of course, if you oversleep in the morning, you can always count on the friendly voice of a crewmember announcing that breakfast is ready or that a whale has been sighted on the starboard side of the ship.
(Review ID: 1062)
 
The Wilderness Explorer is a "green ship" and takes that commitment seriously., January 25, 2014

Reviewer: Jackieblog
Pros: Getting up close to the spectacular attractions of Alaska, seeing true beauty.
Cons: Food is good but nothing to write home about.
Date of cruise: August 2012
Departure port: Sitka
Region visited: Alaska
Cabin category: Inside
Found through: AllThingCruise.com
Good for children: No
Good for teenagers: No
    
Jackieblog saw things this way
Value For Money   4.00/5  (4)
Cabin Design   4.00/5  (4)
Entertainment   2.00/5  (2)
Food Quality   2.00/5  (2)
Ship Maintenance   4.00/5  (4)
Staff and Service   4.00/5  (4)

A bamboo plant grows in a bowl in my cabin. Reusable water bottles by the sink are a reminder to conserve water and drinking utensils. Cloth napkins on the dining table take the place of paper. No Styrofoam or plastic cups or glasses are used on this vessel. Daily menus are posted on a bulletin board. No paper menus are printed. Recycling efforts are everywhere.

On our weeklong cruise through the Alaskan wilderness, I notice many of the efforts made by the American Safari Cruise Line. My itinerary and all my preparations for the trip, in fact, were made electronically. Cutting back on the use of paper is an ongoing goal.

The ship doesn’t use daily menus on tables. Instead, menus are posted on a bulletin board. A list of passenger names also is posted on the bulletin board and next to your name, you chose whether you want meat, fish or vegetarian for dinner.

For those delicious meals, the chef supports local economies by buying salmon, fish and other locally-produced foods and products whenever possible. One of my favorite dinners so far has been the crab cake with sweet chili aioli and the strawberry shortcake for dessert. This is the real strawberry shortcake like my mother used to make with biscuit-type shortcake instead of those little squishy cakes that most grocery stores sell for shortcake. The strawberries are fresh and not overly sugared, topped with what must have been real whipped cream.

The bamboo plants in every cabin and in the lounge on the Wilderness Explorer are a pleasant touch of green without having to buy cut flowers.

As for cleaning – which the ship’s crew seems to do constantly to keep everything looking lovely – the ship uses “green” cleaning supplies.

Eco-friendly toiletries and amenities are provided for passengers. Instead of bars of soap and bottles of shampoo and body wash, the Wilderness Explorer has soap and shampoo dispensers in the shower and by the bathroom sink. Those cute little bottles that many hotels supply are nice but they do seem a waste of plastic, as do bars of soap that are often opened, used a few times and then left for the housekeeper to discard when the guest checks out.

The ship also encourages less frequent washing of linens, which I always support when a hotel or motel offers the choice. I don’t wash my bedcovers at home every night, nor do I wash my bath towels after one use so I see no need to have it done when I am staying in a hotel, motel, ship or other accommodations.

Cruising some of the world’s most fragile and pristine ecosystems, the Wilderness Explorer believes it is a privilege to explore the world’s natural wonders and strives to leave a positive impact on the people and communities they visit.

“Our few people leave only footprints behind, but they also leave with a renewed spirit about how amazing nature and its wild inhabitants can be,” the company brochure notes.

The company’s goal “is to leave nothing but footprints and take nothing but photos.”
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